Mark Wainberg Unexpectedly Dies - Scientist, Outspoken Social Advocate, Leader
 
Back grey arrow rt.gif
 
 
Mark Wainberg Unexpectedly Dies - Scientist, Outspoken Social Advocate, Leader
 
 
  Mark was a leader in HIV globally from the early days.
 
"Pioneering Canadian HIV/AIDS researcher and social activist Mark Wainberg, PhD, died April 12 at age 71. Dr Wainberg drowned while swimming in Bal Harbour, Florida.....Dr Wainberg and his collaborators were the first to identify the antiviral capabilities of 3TC (lamivudine), in collaboration with BioChem Pharma Inc, in 1989. He was also known for multiple contributions to the field of HIV drug resistance, including the identification of many of the mutations in the HIV genome that fuel drug resistance.......Dr. Wainberg did not limit himself to laboratory work. He became an outspoken advocate for human rights, from denouncing the criminalization of HIV-AIDS, through to demanding that treatment be more available and affordable, especially in the developing world."Dr Wainberg's research and that of his colleagues is acknowledged as having helped to save millions of lives around the world.....While president of the International AIDS Society,Dr. Wainberg was a leader in bringing the International AIDS Conference to Durban, South Africa in 2000.".....In more recent years, Dr Wainberg turned his attention to attempts to achieve a cure for HIV infection.....Dr. Mark A. Wainberg is head of AIDS research at the Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research (LDI), Director of the McGill University AIDS Centre located at the LDI, and Professor of Medicine and of Microbiology and Immunology at McGill University in Montreal. He is an internationally recognized scientist in the field of HIV/AIDS, who served as President of the International AIDS Society between 1998 and 2000 with responsibilities that included organizing the XIIIth International Congress on AIDS in Durban, South Africa in 2000. Dr. Wainberg is proud of the role that he played in choosing South Africa as a venue for this congress, which had an important impact on the issue of access to anti-HIV drugs in developing countries. He is well-known for his initial identification of 3TC as an anti-viral drug, in collaboration with BioChem Pharma Inc, in 1989, as well as for multiple contributions to the field of HIV drug resistance including the identification of many of the mutations in the HIV genome that are responsible for drug resistance.....Dr Wainberg was a strong and vocal advocate for people with AIDS and championed providing AIDS-related relief to developing countries. He was critical of politicians who ignore the problem of AIDS, including former South African President Thabo Mbeki.....Dr. Wainberg advocated giving AIDS-related relief to developing countries. He was critical of politicians who ignore the problem of AIDS, including former South African President. Dr. Wainberg also opposed the pseudoscientific ideas of AIDS denialism that are responsible for an estimated 330,000 AIDS deaths in South Africa alone....."He was passionate. If you bumped into him in the airport, you got an earful about some issue he cared about at the moment," recalled Bernstein, the former head of the New York-based Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise....."He cared a lot about the people around him. He had a very good sense of humour. He didn't shy away from controversy," Bernstein said, noting that as the president of the International AIDS Society from 1998 to 2000, Wainberg bridged the gap between researchers and doctors on one side and patients and advocacy groups on the other.
 
The inclusive, collaborative tone he set at the International AIDS meeting held in Montreal in 1989, in the early years of the epidemic, "echoed for decades afterwards," he said.....Dr Wainberg also opposed "AIDS denialism." In an interview in 2004, he proposed that those who harm others by publicly questioning HIV as the cause of AIDS should be charged with endangerment of public health and be jailed if convicted of the crime.....Dr. Mark Wainberg was being remembered Wednesday by Canadian LGBT activists and fellow scientists as a groundbreaking HIV researcher and passionate advocate for people living with the disease.....Wainberg was also a Past President of Congregation Tifereth Beth David Jerusalem"
 
from Jules: This is a very sad day for me and our entire HIV community globally. I knew Mark for 20 years from the early days of my involvement in my work. Mark was a global leader in HIV since the mid 1990s, not only as a leading scientist & researcher, he was involved in the many social issues in HIV. I was a regular attendee at every Resistance Workshop from the very early days when HV drug resistance was first being explored & understood, and Mark being one of the leading HIV drug resistance researchers was an outspoken leader in HIV drug resistance at every annual workshop globally, which is where I first got to know Mark. Mark and his unique friendly personality & scientific vigor was a presence at every Resistance Workshop. He was not shy and he was always a very active contributor at the workshops beyond contributing scientific papers as abstracts. Later his leadership in having the 1st Intl AIDS Conference in Durban, because he knew that would help to focus the world's attention on a place that needed attention, and this became the central theme in how the IAS chose where in the world the IAS meetings would be held, which country needed to have global attention brought to them, and the future sites were always in places like South Africa. Here is a collection of stories online today about Mark, noting his commitment to the diverse people with HIV and their issues globally and in Canada and his long and strong history of research discoveries and numerous research publications. I knew him at all the many conferences I traveled to since 1993 and he was always outspoken at the microphone expressing opinions about many scientific questions and issues, and was always a very friendly person to me and many others, and dedicated to many different causes. This is a horrible loss.......
 
-------------------
 
HIV Pioneer Mark Wainberg, PhD, Dies Unexpectedly
 
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/878541
 
April12,2017
 
Pioneering Canadian HIV/AIDS researcher and social activist Mark Wainberg, PhD, died April 12 at age 71. Dr Wainberg drowned while swimming in Bal Harbour, Florida.
 
Dr Wainberg's family was with him, and his son tried to rescue him, according to media reports citing comments from Bal Harbour Acting Police Chief Miguel De La Rose. It appears Dr Wainberg's son swam out to where he had seen his dad, was able to locate him, and began to swim back to shore with him. Other people on the beach went into the water to help bring him onto the shore. He was transported to the hospital, where he was pronounced dead.
 
Major Force in HIV Science
 
Dr Wainberg was a leader in the fight against AIDS. In a tweet, Paul Volberding, MD, of the University of California, San Francisco, wrote, "Very sad to hear the Mark Wainberg drowned. He was a major force in HIV science. Will be missed."
 
At the time of his death, Dr Wainberg was the head of AIDS research at the Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research (LDI), director of the McGill University AIDS Center at the Montreal Jewish General Hospital, and professor of medicine, microbiology, and immunology at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.
 
Dr Wainberg received a BSc from McGill University in 1966, a PhD from Columbia University in 1972, and did his postdoctoral research at Hadassah Medical School of the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel.
 
Dr Wainberg and his collaborators were the first to identify the antiviral capabilities of 3TC (lamivudine), in collaboration with BioChem Pharma Inc, in 1989. He was also known for multiple contributions to the field of HIV drug resistance, including the identification of many of the mutations in the HIV genome that fuel drug resistance.
 
In more recent years, Dr Wainberg turned his attention to attempts to achieve a cure for HIV infection. His attempts were based on the possibility that HIV may not be able to become resistant to integrase inhibitors that block viral replication. "Dr Wainberg's research and that of his colleagues is acknowledged as having helped to save millions of lives around the world," LDI says on its website.
 
Dr Wainberg served as president of the International AIDS Society from 1998 to 2000, co-chair of the XVI International AIDS Conference in 2006, and was a past president of the Canadian Association for HIV Research.
 
At the time of his passing, Dr Wainberg was editor-in-chief of the Journal of the International AIDS Society and editor of Retrovirology. He also served as editor for several other publications, including the Journal of Human Virology, the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, International Antiviral News, AIDS Patient Care and STDs, the Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases, and AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses.
 
Dr Wainberg received numerous awards and recognitions for his work. In 2001, he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada, Canada's highest civilian honor, for his "major contributions to the study and treatment" of HIV/AIDS. In 2005, he was made an Officer of the National Order of Quebec, an order of merit bestowed by the government of the Province of Quebec.
 
In 2000, he was made a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and in 2008, he was named a Chevalier de Legion d'honneur, the highest honor given by France.
 
Dr Wainberg was a strong and vocal advocate for people with AIDS and championed providing AIDS-related relief to developing countries. He was critical of politicians who ignore the problem of AIDS, including former South African President Thabo Mbeki.
 
Dr Wainberg also opposed "AIDS denialism." In an interview in 2004, he proposed that those who harm others by publicly questioning HIV as the cause of AIDS should be charged with endangerment of public health and be jailed if convicted of the crime.
 
----------------------------
 
Dr. Mark A. Wainberg
 
Senior Investigator, Lady Davis Institute
Director of the McGill University AIDS Centre
Professor, Medicine, and Microbiology and Immunology, McGill University
 
http://www.ladydavis.ca/en/markwainberg
 
Dr. Wainberg's Publications Indexed on PubMed
 
Dr. Mark A. Wainberg is head of AIDS research at the Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research (LDI), Director of the McGill University AIDS Centre located at the LDI, and Professor of Medicine and of Microbiology and Immunology at McGill University in Montreal. He is an internationally recognized scientist in the field of HIV/AIDS, who served as President of the International AIDS Society between 1998 and 2000 with responsibilities that included organizing the XIIIth International Congress on AIDS in Durban, South Africa in 2000. Dr. Wainberg is proud of the role that he played in choosing South Africa as a venue for this congress, which had an important impact on the issue of access to anti-HIV drugs in developing countries. He is well-known for his initial identification of 3TC as an anti-viral drug, in collaboration with BioChem Pharma Inc, in 1989, as well as for multiple contributions to the field of HIV drug resistance including the identification of many of the mutations in the HIV genome that are responsible for drug resistance.
 
More recently, Dr. Wainberg has turned his attention to attempts to achieve a cure for HIV infection based on the possibility that HIV may not be able to become resistant to certain new compounds termed Integrase inhibitors that block viral replication. Dr. Wainberg's research and that of his colleagues is acknowledged as having helped to save millions of lives around the world and Dr. Wainberg is a member of numerous international advisory committees in the field of AIDS including several of the World Health Organization. Among other distinctions and numerous awards for his work, he is a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, an Officer of the Order of Canada, an officer of the Ordre National du Quebec, an honorary fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, and a Chevalier in the Legion d'Honneur of France.
 
Major Research Activities
 
Dr. Wainberg's lab conducts cutting-edge research on differences among various HIV subtypes in regard to the development of drug resistance and the deeper mechanistic bases of these differences. These observations have beeen shown to have clinical relevanceand were first identified by Dr.Wainberg's laboratory.
 
The major focus of Dr. Wainberg's work is now an examination of the antiviral effects of HIV Integrase inhibitors and whether certain drugs in this category may be impervious to the development of drug resistance. Dr. Wainberg is also exploring whether the non-development of drug resistance might help to point the way toward a cure of HIV infection. Dr. Wainberg's group also studies the use of anti-retroviral drugs to prevent the transmission of HIV, while exploring whether drug resistance and the creation of drug-resistant viruses might be a negative consequence of this preventive approach.
 
--------------------------------
 
Mark Wainberg
 
Mark Wainberg drowned while on a vacation in Florida.[11]
 
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Wainberg.......
 
Accomplishments and honors
 
Wainberg and his collaborators were the first to identify the antiviral capabilities of 3TC in 1989 and test the drug in patients. 3TC is also called lamivudine. From 1998 to 2000, Wainberg was President of the International AIDS Society. He was Co-Chair of the XVI International AIDS Conference and a past president of the Canadian Association for HIV Research. Wainberg was an Editor-in Chief of the Journal of the International AIDS Society and Editor of Retrovirology. He was also an editor on publications including the Journal of Human Virology, Journal of Leukocyte Biology, International Antiviral News, AIDS Patient Care and STDs, Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases and AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses.
 
In 2001, he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada, Canada's highest civilian honour, for his "major contributions to the study and treatment of" HIV/AIDS.[2] In 2005, he was made an Officer of the National Order of Quebec, an order of merit bestowed by the government of the Province of Quebec.[3] In 2000, he was made a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. In 2008, Wainberg was named a Chevalier de Legion d'honneur, the highest honor given by the country of France.[4] In 2014, he was awarded the John G. Fitzgerald - CACMID Outstanding Microbiologist Award, which recognized him as "an individual who is outstanding in all aspects [and]... place him in a similar category to that of the individual the award is named after, Dr. John G. FitzGerald."[5]
 
Wainberg was also a Past President of Congregation Tifereth Beth David Jerusalem.[6] Dr. Wainberg advocated giving AIDS-related relief to developing countries. He was critical of politicians who ignore the problem of AIDS, including former South African President Thabo Mbeki.[7] Dr. Wainberg also opposed the pseudoscientific ideas of AIDS denialism that are responsible for an estimated 330,000 AIDS deaths in South Africa alone.[8]
 
AIDS advocacy
 
In 2006, Dr. Wainberg was the Co-Chair of the XVI International AIDS Conference.[9] In 2004, he was videotaped by AIDS denialist Robin Scovill, whose HIV-positive wife died in 2008 and whose daughter died of untested and untreated AIDS in 2005.[10] In this interview, Dr. Wainberg proposed that those who harm others by publicly questioning HIV as the cause of AIDS should be charged with endangerment of public health and jailed if convicted of crime.
 
----------------
 
Pioneering Canadian HIV/AIDS researcher Mark Wainberg drowns in Florida
 
MONTREAL-The Globe and Mail
 
Published Wednesday, Apr. 12, 2017 5:27PM EDT
 
However, Dr. Wainberg did not limit himself to laboratory work. He became an outspoken advocate for human rights, from denouncing the criminalization of HIV-AIDS, through to demanding that treatment be more available and affordable, especially in the developing world.
 
While president of the International AIDS Society, Dr. Wainberg was instrumental in bringing the International AIDS Conference to Durban, South Africa in 2000. The pressure exerted by activists led to the availability of low-cost treatments; today, 18.2 million people worldwide take antiretrovirals, almost half of the 36.7 million who are infected.
 
In recent years, Dr. Wainberg had once again returned to the lab. His work identifying mutations in the HIV genome led him to believe replication of the virus could be blocked with medication and patients cured of HIV.
 
In 2015, Dr. Wainberg was named to the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame for his contributions to medicine and "for having made the world a better place."
 
He is also an officer of the Order of Canada, an officer of the Ordre national du Quebec, and a Chevalier in the Legion d'Honneur of France.
 
Miguel De La Rosa, acting chief of the Bal Harbour Police Department in suburban Miami, said they responded to a 911 call on Tuesday after Dr. Wainberg was pulled unconscious from the water.
 
Police said that a family member, after losing sight of Dr. Wainberg, swam out to help; he and bystanders pulled him to the beach. Paramedics performed CPR, but he was declared dead at the hospital. It is unclear if he died from drowning or another reason.
 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/renowned-canadian-hivaids-researcher-dr-mark-wainberg-drowns-in-florida/article34691197/
 
--------------------------------
 
Renowned Canadian HIV/AIDS researcher Dr. Mark Wainberg drowns in Florida
 
http://www.680news.com/2017/04/12/renowned-canadian-hivaids-researcher-dr-mark-wainberg-drowns-florida/
 
Dr. Mark Wainberg was being remembered Wednesday by Canadian LGBT activists and fellow scientists as a groundbreaking HIV researcher and passionate advocate for people living with the disease.
 
The 71-year-old Wainberg, director of the McGill University AIDS Centre, drowned Tuesday afternoon in Florida while swimming with his son in rough waters off Bal Harbour, Fla. He is believed to have drowned on Tuesday afternoon while on holiday with his family in Miami.
 
Dr. Wainberg identified 3TC (Lamivudine) as an antiviral, and it became one of the first effective treatments for people who contracted HIV. Later, he also published some of the earliest research on the effectiveness of antiretroviral cocktails.
 
Linda Farha president of the Farha Foundation, a Montreal-based HIV/AIDS research fundraising organization said Wainberg was "enormous" in his field.
 
He was one of the doctors who helped her brother, Ron Farha, who founded the organization before he died of the disease.
 
"Dr. Wainberg was very present in Ron's life and was a shining light for my brother," she told The Canadian Press. "He hoped that something would happen one day. That he would find a cure."
 
Farha said Wainberg was part of the medical team that discovered the first antiviral drug to treat patients with the human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV.
 
"He played such a big role on so many different levels," she said. "And he was certainly a believer that he would be part of the team that would find a cure, but unfortunately he passed away before that."
 
Bal Harbour police said officers were called on reports of a person struggling in the water at about 2:40 p.m. Tuesday. Acting Capt. Miguel De La Rosa said Wainberg's son was able to pull his father back to shore, where officers administered CPR. But, Wainberg was later pronounced dead in hospital.
 
De La Rosa said there were red flags posted at the beach due to high surf and high current at the time.
 
Alan Bernstein, president and CEO of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR), said Wainberg was known worldwide for his research into HIV.
 
"He played a major role in the discovery and the potential use of a drug called 3TC in HIV antiretroviral treatment," said Bernstein. "And he was one of the first to show that HIV could acquire (genetic) mutations that conferred resistance to HIV drugs."
 
Wainberg was also an outspoken advocate for people with HIV and for destigmatizing those living with the disease, securing support for AIDS research and treatment from governments around the world, he said.
 
"He was passionate. If you bumped into him in the airport, you got an earful about some issue he cared about at the moment," recalled Bernstein, the former head of the New York-based Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise.
 
"He cared a lot about the people around him. He had a very good sense of humour. He didn't shy away from controversy," Bernstein said, noting that as the president of the International AIDS Society from 1998 to 2000, Wainberg bridged the gap between researchers and doctors on one side and patients and advocacy groups on the other.
 
The inclusive, collaborative tone he set at the International AIDS meeting held in Montreal in 1989, in the early years of the epidemic, "echoed for decades afterwards," he said.
 
Julio Montaner, director of the B.C. Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, called Wainberg a mentor and said the researcher's passion is what made him stand out in the field.
 
"As a basic scientist, he would not be content with just making a significant scientific contribution, but he would pursue the right amount of advocacy both public and political to ensure that those developments would be implemented and translated into real change and difference," Montaner said.
 
The community will miss him dearly, he added.
 
"Today we mourn a giant of medicine, science, advocacy and HIV is suffering as a result of it," Montaner said.
 
Laurent McCutcheon, a longtime activist in the LGBT community in Montreal and former high-level bureaucrat in the Quebec government, used the word "credibility" to describe Wainberg's contribution.
 
He said in the 1980s and 1990s, when HIV was thought as solely a problem for the gay community, Wainberg's research and public outreach educated the public about the disease. McCutcheon said Wainberg had a close relationship with the gay community and understood how the disease disproportionately affected gay men.
 
"He was an authority here and around the world," he said. "It's not just about education, but people have to believe you. He was credible."
 
Farha added that Wainberg was critical in giving her family's foundation legitimacy in the beginning.
 
"He attended every single event, like annual walks, galas and he was part of the outreach," she said. "He was a people person. He didn't just sit in his lab. He was a pioneer, but also cared about dedicating his life for the cause."
 
In 2001, he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada for "major contributions to the study and treatment" of HIV/AIDS. In 2008, Wainberg was named a Chevalier de Legion d'honneur, the highest honour given by France.

 
 
 
 
  iconpaperstack View Older Articles   Back to Top   www.natap.org